Month: November 2016

Scientific misconduct

Scientific misconduct is the violation of the standard codes of scholarly conduct and ethical behavior in professional scientific research. A Lancet review on Handling of Scientific Misconduct in Scandinavian countries provides the following sample definitions: (reproduced in The COPE report 1999.) Danish definition: “Intention or gross negligence leading to fabrication of the scientific message or …

Piltdown Man

The Piltdown Man was a paleoanthropological hoax in which bone fragments were presented as the fossilised remains of a previously unknown early human. In 1912 amateur archaeologist Charles Dawson claimed he had discovered the “missing link” between ape and man. After finding a section of a human-like skull in Pleistocene gravel beds near Piltdown, East …

Impure Placebos

Out of 783 doctors, 12% said they had used “pure” placebo (sugar pills, saline injections) while 97% had used “impure placebos” (prescribing drugs without scientific basis, like antibiotics for viruses). More than three-quarters said they did so at least once a week, and many didn’t have an ethical problem with deceiving patients if treatments were …

What is the Speed of Gravity?

Quantum experiments have long demonstrated that subatomic particles somehow “know” about each other instantly, and at great distances. Institutional science utilizes terms such as quantum entanglement and spooky action to describe the phenomena. But the Electric Universe theory offers a very different perspective. The speed of light limit to communication imposed by the theory of …

The RetroPsychoKinesis Project

The more generally-defined effect known as psychokinesis (PK) has been studied extensively since the 1930’s when J.B. Rhine (Duke University) began systematically testing claims that seemingly random events such as dice and coin throws are subject to subtle psychic influences. His succesor, Helmut Schmidt, increased the rigour and efficiency of these experiments by introducing an …

The Curious Case of Charles Darwin and Homeopathy

In 1849, Charles Darwin was so ill that he was unable to work one out of every 3 days, and after having various troubling symptoms for 2–12 years, he wrote to a friend that he was ‘going the way of all flesh’. He sought treatment from Dr James Manby Gully, a medical doctor who used …

The very special interest of some scientists

Brian David Josephson Brian David Josephson, best known for his pioneering work on superconductivity and quantum tunnelling and awarded for the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1973 for his prediction of the Josephson effect. Josephson became interested in philosophy of mind in the late sixties and, in particular, in the mind–body problem, and is one …

The Spiral Periodic Table

In this theory the elements of the Periodic Table are standing waves over a period of time. Time is continuously being formed by the spontaneous absorption and emission of light waves of EMR. This forms a universal process of spherical symmetry forming and breaking that forms the spiral patterns we see in our everyday life …